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Facials And Skin Care Treatments

Last year, Americans spent nearly $17 billion on spa services. A lot of that money went toward facials: treatments that claim to remove blemishes, combat wrinkles, moisturize, regenerate, tighten and otherwise beautify the skin so that your face looks fabulous.But is there evidence to support the claims (and costs) of these treatments? Experts say it depends on the type of facial, where you have it performed and the skin benefit you’re hoping to get out of it.

“I was at this beautiful spa in Santa Fe, and the esthetician giving me a facial said the next citrus emollient she was going to apply would help cleanse my liver,” recalls Ushma Neill, editor-at-large of the Journal of Clinical Investigation and vice president of scientific education and training at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. “I almost sat up in disbelief.”

That experience, Neill says, prompted her to investigate the existing science on spa facials. She published her findings in a 2012 report. Her conclusion? “I realized just how useless it all was,” she says. “I haven’t had a facial since I wrote that article.”

Neill says she doesn’t dispute claims that facials can temporarily revamp the skin by “moisturizing it to the max” and removing pimples and other blemishes. But when it comes to many of the fancier, pricier services that claim to combat aging or inflammation—everything from ozone and antioxidant treatments to stem-cell extract applications—most of that stuff is “complete malarkey,” she says.

Other experts reiterate that point. “As a dermatologist, I see a lot of patients with misperceptions about different creams and procedures and the whole concept of facials,” says Dr. Joel Cohen, an associate clinical professor of dermatology at the University of Colorado and director of AboutSkin Dermatology and DermSurgery near Denver.Apart from moisturizing the skin, Cohen says most topical creams are unlikely to provide much lasting benefit—especially if applied sporadically and only in a spa setting. And while some chemical peels that use substances like salicylic or glycolic acid can help stimulate skin cell turnover and repair, Cohen says proper daily skin care—regular cleansing and applying moisturizer and sunscreen—are a lot more likely to be helpful.

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Highlight/Lowlight

Choose hair colors one to two shades darker than natural color for natural results. For more dramatic results, go for shades two to four shades darker. If this is your first time dyeing your hair, you may want to try using temporary or semi-permanent dye rather than permanent dye.

  • Temporary dyes tend to wash out after one shampoo.[1]
  • Semi-permanent dyes will wash out after 20 to 26 shampoos.
  • Permanent dyes may fade, but they usually stay in your hair until it grows out.

Highlights are essentially the opposite of lowlights. Highlight colors should be one to two shades lighter than your natural hair color. For more dramatic results, go for shades three to four shades darker.

  • You may need to bleach your hair to highlight it, which is best done in a salon.

Divide your hair into five sections. Make sure your five sections are roughly even. There should be one section on the top of your head. Then, on either side of your head, separate the hair into two sections. When you’re done, you should be left with one section of hair on top and four sections on the sides. Use rubber bands or hair clips to secure your hair.[2]

  • In other words, you should have three sections in the front of your head, and two in the back.

Use the slicing method to separate hair for a more dramatic look. Let down one of the sections. Starting at the top of the section, insert the end of your comb through your hair. Only a very thin section of hair should be on top of the end of the comb. Remember that for both highlight and lowlights, you should apply dye to very thin chunks of hair.

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Hair Cutting

A hairstyle, hairdo, or haircut refers to the styling of hair, usually on the human scalp. Sometimes, this could also mean an editing of facial or body hair. The fashioning of hair can be considered an aspect of personal grooming, fashion, and cosmetics, although practical, cultural, and popular considerations also influence some hairstyles.

The oldest known depiction of hair styling is hair braiding which dates back about 30,000 years. In history, women’s hair was often elaborately and carefully dressed in special ways. From the time of the Roman Empire until the Middle Ages, most women grew their hair as long as it would naturally grow. Between the late 15th century and the 16th century, a very high hairline on the forehead was considered attractive. Around the same time period, European men often wore their hair cropped no longer than shoulder-length. In the early 17th century, male hairstyles grew longer, with waves or curls being considered desirable.

The male wig was pioneered by King Louis XIII of France (1601–1643) in 1624. Perukes or periwigs for men were introduced into the English-speaking world with other French styles in 1660. Late 17th-century wigs were very long and wavy, but became shorter in the mid-18th century, by which time they were normally white. Short hair for fashionable men was a product of the Neoclassical movement. In the early 19th century the male beard, and also moustaches and sideburns, made a strong reappearance. From the 16th to the 19th century, European women’s hair became more visible while their hair coverings grew smaller. In the middle of the 18th century the pouf style developed. During the First World War, women around the world started to shift to shorter hairstyles that were easier to manage. In the early 1950s women’s hair was generally curled and worn in a variety of styles and lengths. In the 1960s, many women began to wear their hair in short modern cuts such as the pixie cut, while in the 1970s, hair tended to be longer and looser. In both the 1960s and 1970s many men and women wore their hair very long and straight.In the 1980s, women pulled back their hair with scrunchies. During the 1980s, punk hairstyles were adopted by many people.

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The 6 Secrets That Will Help Your Hair Salon and Day Spa

In Start Your Own Hair Salon and Day Spa, the staff at Entrepreneur Press and writer Eileen Figure Sandlin explain how you can launch a successful full-service hair salon and day spa, a business that can be personally rewarding, makes a lot of people happy and can be very lucrative. In this edited excerpt, the authors reveal the six aspects of your business that can help make your salon or day spa profitable.

It’s never too soon to start thinking about some of the operational issues that will impact and contribute to the success of your business. To begin with, you must consider your hours of operation carefully so you can accommodate the maximum number of clients during the business day.

You undoubtedly already know the beauty business isn’t a 9-to-5 kind of industry. Typically, hair salons in metropolitan areas are open from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. seven days a week and from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. in smaller communities. By design, Sunday and holiday hours often are the same as those of local retailers like malls and department stores, and generally run from noon to 5 p.m. Lunch hours and early evening hours tend to be the busiest times for salons. You also may need to have hours to accommodate special needs. For example, if you do a lot of wedding work, you’ll probably have to be open earlier on Saturday mornings, say at 7 a.m., for brides who have to get to church for a 10 a.m. service.

Salon owners who manage their time in a way that enhances their money-making ability will find their business will grow and prosper faster. Focus with laser-like intensity on income-generating activities. As a new owner, you’ll be tempted to try to do it all yourself—from working behind the chair, to managing the books and overseeing your staff. Instead, hire skilled staff (both business and salon professionals) to handle the day-to-day work, then delegate responsibilities so you can devote yourself to tasks that can help you grow the business and make more money.